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Tagetik provides financial performance management software. One particularly useful aspect of its suite is the Collaborative Disclosure Management (CDM). CDM addresses an important need in finance departments, which routinely generate highly formatted documents that combine words and numbers. Often these documents are assembled by contributors outside of the finance department; human resources, facilities, legal and corporate groups are the most common. The data used in these reports almost always come from multiple sources – not just enterprise systems such as ERP and financial consolidation software but also individual spreadsheets and databases that collect and store nonfinancial data (such as information about leased facilities, executive compensation, fixed assets, acquisitions and corporate actions). Until recently, these reports were almost always cobbled together manually – a painstaking process made even more time-consuming by the need to double-check the documents for accuracy and consistency. The adoption of a more automated approach was driven by the requirement imposed several years ago by United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that companies tag their required periodic disclosure filings using eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL), which I have written about. This mandate created a tipping point in the workload, making the manual approach infeasible for a large number of companies and motivating them to adopt tools to automate the process. Although disclosure filings were the initial impetus to acquire collaborative disclosure management software, companies have found it useful for generating a range of formatted periodic reports that combine text and data, including board books (internal documents for senior executives and members of the board of directors), highly formatted periodic internal reports and filings with nonfinancial regulators or lien holders.

vr_fcc_financial_close_and_automation_updatedTagetik’s Collaborative Disclosure Management automates the document creation process, eliminating many repetitive, mechanical functions and reducing the time needed to administer the process and ensure accuracy. Automation can shorten finance processes significantly. For example, our benchmark research on trends in developing the fast, clean close finds that companies that use little or no automation in their accounting close take almost twice as long to complete the process as those that fully automate it (9.1 days vs. 5.7 days). Manually assembling the narrative text from perhaps dozens of contributors and combining it with data used in tables and elsewhere in the document is a time-consuming chore. Regulatory filings are legal documents that must be completely accurate and conform to mandated presentation styles. They require careful review to ensure accuracy and completeness. Complicating this effort recently are increasingly stringent deadlines, especially in the U.S. Anyone who has been a party to these efforts knows that there can be frequent changes in the narratives and presentation of the numbers as they are reviewed by different parties, and those responsible need to ensure that any change to a number that occurs is automatically reflected everywhere that amount is cited in the document; to use the depreciation and amortization figure as an example, that would include the statement of cash flows, income statement, the text of the management discussion and analysis and the text or tables of one or more footnotes. Moreover, automated systems afford greater control over the data used. They make it possible to answer the common question of where a number came from quickly and with complete assurance. While inaccuracies in other types of financial documents may not have legal consequences, mistakes can have reputational or financial consequences.

Those managing the process also spend a great deal of energy simply checking the document to ensure that the various sections include the latest wording, that the numbers are consistent in the tables and text, that amounts have been rounded properly (which can be really complicated) and that the right people have signed off on every part of the filing. Automation obviates the need for much of these tasks. Tagetik’s CDM workflow-enables the process, so handoffs are automated, participants get alerts if they haven’t completed their steps in timely fashion, and administrators can keep track of where everyone is in the process. Workflow also promotes consistent execution of the process, and the workflows can be easily modified as needed.

In designing Collaborative Disclosure Management, Tagetik took advantage of users’ widespread familiarity with Microsoft Excel and Word to reduce the amount of training required to use its product. CDM’s workflow design makes it relatively easy for business users to define and modify business process automation. Typically, individuals or small groups work on different sections of the document. CDM enables multiple contributors from finance, accounting, legal, corporate and other functions to work with their part of the document without being concerned about other contributors’ versions. Work can proceed smoothly, and those administering the process can see at any time which components have been completed, are in progress or have not even started. Tagetik’s software can cut the time required to prepare any periodic document, since once a company has configured its system to create what is in effect a template, it’s relatively easy to generate these documents on monthly, quarterly or annual bases. The numbers relevant to the current period are updated from the specified controlled sources, and references to tabular data within the text are automatically adjusted to tie back to these new figures. Often a large percentage of the narrative text is boilerplate that either must not be updated or requires only limited editing to reflect new information. Starting with the previous edition of the report, contributors can quickly mark up a revised version, and reviewers can focus only on what has changed. Other important automation features are data validation, which reduces errors and revisions, and the system’s ability to round numbers using the appropriate statutory methodology.

CDM also handles XBRL tagging, which is essential for all SEC documents and necessary for an increasing number of regulatory filings around the world. The software specifically handles tagging for the two main European prudential regulatory filings for banks and other credit extending institutions, COREP (Common Reporting related to capital) and FINREP (Financial Reporting performed in a consistent fashion across multiple countries).

VR-BUG-WEBCompanies can gain several key benefits by automating the production of their periodic regulatory filings and internal or external financial reports that combine text and data. One of the most important is time. Automation can substantially reduce the time that highly trained and well-compensated people spend on mechanical tasks (freeing them to do more productive things), and the process can be completed sooner. Having the basic work completed sooner gives senior executives and outside directors more time to review the document before it must be filed or made public. Time that can be devoted to considering how best to polish the narratives or if necessary lengthen upstream deadlines to handle last-minute developments and consider options for how best to treat accounting events. Automation can also reduce the chance of errors, since the numbers tie directly back to the source systems and (if properly configured) ensure that references in the narratives and footnotes to items in tables and the numbers in those table agree completely. Restatements of financial reports caused by errors are relatively rare but when they occur are exceptionally costly for public companies’ reputations.

Disclosure management systems are an essential component for any financial performance management (FPM) system. All midsize and larger corporations should be using this software to automate the production of their periodic mandated filings and other documents that combine text and data. They will find that they are useful in cutting the time and effort required to produce these documents, provide senior executives and directors more time to review and craft the final versions, and reduce the chance of errors in the process. Companies that are using older FPM software should investigate replacing it with an FPM suite to gain the additional capabilities – including disclosure management – that newer suites offer. Tagetik’s should be among the financial systems evaluated for office of finance.

Regards,

Robert Kugel – SVP Research

Longview Solutions has a longstanding presence in the financial performance management (FPM) software market and was rated a VI_FPM_Hot_VendorHot vendor in our most recent FPM Value Index. Several years ago it began offering a tax provision and planning application. I think it’s worthwhile to focus on the tax category because it’s less well known than others in finance and is an engine of growth for Longview. We expect larger corporations increasingly to adopt software to manage direct (income) taxes to improve the quality and efficiency of what today in most companies is an inefficient, spreadsheet-driven process.

Longview’s tax offering consists of four main components. Its Tax Data Platform can be the central repository of a corporation’s tax information. I’ve commented on the need to maintain tax data separate from the data that’s used for financial reporting, managerial accounting and performance management. One reason is that tax accounting must be aligned with legal entities, not corporate organizational structures, because direct taxes are levied on legal entities, not corporate divisions or reporting hierarchies. A second is that tax data must be held in an “as was” state, without regard to subsequent corporate actions such as acquisitions and divestitures or management reorganizations. Longview’s Tax Data Collection software consolidates book and tax data from disparate source systems; it is designed to automate and streamline the movement of data and eliminate time-consuming manual work. It can do consolidations in different, parallel paths if dissimilar methods of consolidating tax-related data are required by the statutes of individual taxing authorities. The Tax Provision/Reporting component performs global tax accounting and reporting. And Tax Planning supports a company’s analysis and planning of its taxes.

Software vendors are taking two different approaches to dedicated tax management software. One mostly focuses on the needs of the finance department: It automates and simplifies incorporation of already calculated tax data into the financial consolidation and close process. This is useful for companies that operate in up to a handful of tax jurisdictions and have relatively simple legal entity structures. The other approach addresses the needs of the tax department as well as the rest of the finance organization. Longview’s tax offering falls into the latter category because it provides the functionality and data-handling capabilities that tax departments need to streamline their operations, enhance their ability to manage tax expenses and improve senior executives’ understanding of tax exposures and strategies to deal with them.

Longview’s tax software can replace desktop spreadsheets, which are the most common tool used for direct tax provisioning and planning in companies of all sizes. Spreadsheets are the wrong choice for managing taxes because they are so time-consuming. Tax vr_fcc_tax_insightdepartments use them to make often complex tax calculations, manage tax data and direct tax processes – these are tasks that dedicated software can handle easily but spreadsheets cannot. They are not well equipped to do these tasks quickly and accurately on a consistent basis. Consequently, facing looming deadlines, tax departments have little if any time left over to analyze and plan tax exposure and tax expense options more broadly and more intelligently. Spreadsheets also do not provide sufficient transparency or forward visibility in a timely fashion in the way that a dedicated system can. Spreadsheets make it difficult for companies to manage their tax risk exposure in a consistent fashion across all business units. They do not give executives sufficient insight into their risk exposure options. Our research on the financial close finds that a majority (53%) of finance executives believe that having better understanding of and deeper insight into their company’s tax positions would enable them to reduce their tax expense.

There are several other reasons why desktop spreadsheets are the wrong choice for handling taxes strategically. One is that tax laws and regulations are so fiendishly complex. For example, some countries have industry-specific statutory reporting requirements (for example, for insurance companies and other financial services). Tax calculations for subsidiaries in one country may not apply to those required for a regional headquarters or the parent company. There may be multiple tax rates applicable to a given legal entity and multiple bases or methods on which to apply each tax rate. Moreover, because book accounting for taxes and actual tax calculations almost always differ in multiple ways, it’s necessary to record and track these differences. Since rules, rates and assumptions will vary from year to year, it becomes necessary to adjust these differences. Desktop spreadsheets lack the dimensionality, data integrity and referential integrity necessary to be able to manage this level of detail easily. Dedicated tax management systems are designed to do it.

One reason why tax departments lag in adopting new tools is that until recently the technology necessary for managing the full range of requirements in direct tax analysis, provisioning and compliance was not mature enough for the organizations that needed it the most. Until recently, corporations that operate in multiple, worldwide jurisdictions with even modestly complex legal entity structures overtaxed the ability of IT systems to support them. However, using dedicated software for direct tax management enhances the efficiency of the tax department, enabling it to become more strategic and contribute to improving the company’s results.

Adopting a more strategic approach to managing direct taxes is an emerging trend in finance organizations, but it’s still at an early stage. Tax compliance is usually the main (and overwhelming) focus of tax departments. Most do this essential work reasonably well, but compliance is a tactical issue. To elevate tax management to a strategic level, tax and finance executives must have greater visibility into tax data and how operational decisions affect tax exposures. For example, finance and tax executives may construct a tax-optimized approach to transfer pricing, but their strategy may not be implemented if the company’s incentive compensation system is not aligned to this strategy. Operating managers in high-tax jurisdictions will try to maximize revenues because that’s what they’re rewarded for, even if it results in higher taxes than are necessary. Using spreadsheets is a significant barrier to tax departments taking a more strategic role in their company. When direct taxes are managed using desktop spreadsheets, there rarely is time for organizations to do much more than basic compliance. There’s usually not time to discover the fundamental disconnects between tax strategy and reality or other, similarly strategic activities such as analyzing and assessing the tax implications of long-term corporate plans.

vr_fcc_tax_effectivenessIndeed, one sign of the tax function’s lack of strategic impact is its invisibility. There is a general lack of understanding of how the tax department functions, even within the finance department. For example, our research discovered that nearly two-thirds of finance executives (and, specifically, 60% of CFOs and controllers) do not know how long it takes their tax department to calculate tax liabilities.

Another reason is the relatively low status of tax departments in their company, which we can gauge through the distribution of titles and relatively low compensation for the highly credentialed individuals in these departments. Those that work in tax also tend to be tight-lipped and reluctant to reveal that their processes are time-consuming and difficult to manage, lest they be viewed as less than competent. The tax department’s invisibility contributes to a lack of focus on direct taxation by senior management, which also diminishes an understanding at that level of the potential benefits of investing in technology. Companies that are most likely to want to improve how they manage their direct taxes appear to be the ones where a senior finance department executive has spent time in tax and therefore has a firsthand appreciation for the challenges.

I’ve commented on the need to make tax more strategic. An increasing number of companies are finding that investing in dedicated software to improve the performance of their tax department is worthwhile. It gives them a deeper understanding of how best to manage what is usually one of their biggest expenses and enables them to make more optimal decisions about taxes. I recommend that all larger companies look into the benefits they can achieve by making their tax department more strategic and that they investigate dedicated software such as Longview’s that can enable them to have such a strategic tax function.

Regards,

Robert Kugel – SVP Research

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